Thermal Conductivity Wikipedia

Thermal conductivity - Wikipedia.

The thermal conductivity of a crystal can depend strongly on isotopic purity, assuming other lattice defects are negligible. A notable example is diamond: at a temperature of around 100 K the thermal conductivity increases from 10,000 W.m -1 .K -1 for natural type IIa diamond (98.9% 12 C 12 C at 80 K, assuming an otherwise pure crystal ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity.

Thermal conductivity measurement - Wikipedia.

Thermal conductivity is determined by the linear slope of ?T vs. log(?) curve. The main advantages of the 3?-method are minimization of radiation effects and easier acquisition of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity than in the steady-state techniques. Although some expertise in thin film patterning and microlithography is ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity_measurement.

Thermal conductivity detector - Wikipedia.

The thermal conductivity detector (TCD), also known as a katharometer, is a bulk property detector and a chemical specific detector commonly used in gas chromatography. This detector senses changes in the thermal conductivity of the column eluent and compares it to a reference flow of carrier gas. Since most compounds have a thermal conductivity much less than that of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity_detector.

Thermal management (electronics) - Wikipedia.

A thermal interface material or mastic (aka TIM) is used to fill the gaps between thermal transfer surfaces, such as between microprocessors and heatsinks, in order to increase thermal transfer efficiency.It has a higher thermal conductivity value in Z-direction than xy-direction. Applications Personal computers. Due to recent technological developments and public interest, the retail ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_management_(electronics).

Thermal paste - Wikipedia.

Thermal paste (also called thermal compound, thermal grease, thermal interface material (TIM), thermal gel, heat paste, heat sink compound, heat sink paste or CPU grease) is a thermally conductive (but usually electrically insulating) chemical compound, which is commonly used as an interface between heat sinks and heat sources such as high-power semiconductor devices..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_paste.

Thermal bridge - Wikipedia.

A thermal bridge, also called a cold bridge, heat bridge, or thermal bypass, is an area or component of an object which has higher thermal conductivity than the surrounding materials, creating a path of least resistance for heat transfer. Thermal bridges result in an overall reduction in thermal resistance of the object. The term is frequently discussed in the context of a ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_bridge.

Thermal radiation - Wikipedia.

Overview. Thermal radiation is the emission of electromagnetic waves from all matter that has a temperature greater than absolute zero. Thermal radiation reflects the conversion of thermal energy into electromagnetic energy.Thermal energy is the kinetic energy of random movements of atoms and molecules in matter. All matter with a nonzero temperature is composed of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_radiation.

Soil thermal properties - Wikipedia.

The thermal properties of soil are a component of soil physics that has found important uses in engineering, climatology and agriculture.These properties influence how energy is partitioned in the soil profile.While related to soil temperature, it is more accurately associated with the transfer of energy (mostly in the form of heat) throughout the soil, by radiation, conduction and ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_thermal_properties.

Solids, Liquids and Gases - Thermal Conductivities.

Ethylene - Thermal Conductivity vs. Temperature and Pressure - Online calculator, figures and table showing thermal conductivity of ethylene, also called ethene or acetene, C 2 H 4, at varying temperature and pressure - Imperial and SI Units. Foods - Thermal Conductivities - Thermal conductivity of selected foodstuff like apples, beef, sugar ....

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/thermal-conductivity-d_429.html.

Thermal shock - Wikipedia.

Thermal shock is a type of rapidly transient mechanical load.By definition, it is a mechanical load caused by a rapid change of temperature of a certain point. It can be also extended to the case of a thermal gradient, which makes different parts of an object expand by different amounts. This differential expansion can be more directly understood in terms of strain, than in terms of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_shock.

Thermal resistance - Wikipedia.

Thermal resistance is a heat property and a measurement of a temperature difference by which an object or material resists a heat flow.Thermal resistance is the reciprocal of thermal conductance. (Absolute) thermal resistance R in kelvins per watt (K/W) is a property of a particular component. For example, a characteristic of a heat sink.; Specific thermal resistance ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_resistance.

Silver - Wikipedia.

Silver is a chemical element with the symbol Ag (from the Latin argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European h2erg: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver.

Volumetric heat capacity - Wikipedia.

Thermal inertia (or thermal effusivity) is a term commonly used for modelling heat transfers.It is a bulk material property related to thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. For example, "this material has a high thermal inertia", or "thermal inertia plays an important role in this system", mean that dynamic effects are prevalent in a model, so that a steady-state calculation will ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volumetric_heat_capacity.

Entropy production - Wikipedia.

Entropy production (or generation) is the amount of entropy which is produced in any irreversible processes such as heat and mass transfer processes including motion of bodies, heat exchange, fluid flow, substances expanding or mixing, anelastic deformation of solids, and any irreversible thermodynamic cycle, including thermal machines such as power plants, heat engines, ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_production.

Thermal transmittance - Wikipedia.

Thermal transmittance is the rate of transfer of heat through matter. The thermal transmittance of a material (such as insulation or concrete) ... Conductivity Resistance = thickness / conductivity -- Outside surface -- 0.04 K?m 2 /W 0.10 m (0.33 ft) Clay bricks 0.77 W/(m?K) 0.13 K?m 2 /W 0.05 m (0.16 ft).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_transmittance.

Electron shell - Wikipedia.

In chemistry and atomic physics, an electron shell may be thought of as an orbit followed by electrons around an atom's nucleus.The closest shell to the nucleus is called the "1 shell" (also called the "K shell"), followed by the "2 shell" (or "L shell"), then the "3 shell" (or "M shell"), and so on farther and farther from the nucleus.The shells correspond to the principal quantum numbers ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_shell.

Atomic radii of the elements (data page) - Wikipedia.

The atomic radius of a chemical element is the distance from the center of the nucleus to the outermost shell of an electron. Since the boundary is not a well-defined physical entity, there are various non-equivalent definitions of atomic radius. Depending on the definition, the term may apply only to isolated atoms, or also to atoms in condensed matter, covalently bound in ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_radii_of_the_elements_%28data_page%29.

Quantum tunnelling - Wikipedia.

Quantum tunnelling, also known as tunneling is a quantum mechanical phenomenon whereby a wavefunction can propagate through a potential barrier.. The transmission through the barrier can be finite and depends exponentially on the barrier height and barrier width. The wavefunction may disappear on one side and reappear on the other side..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_tunnelling.

Carbon dioxide - Wikipedia.

Carbon dioxide (chemical formula CO 2) is a chemical compound occurring as a colorless gas with a density about 53% higher than that of dry air. Carbon dioxide molecules consist of a carbon atom covalently double bonded to two oxygen atoms. It occurs naturally in Earth's atmosphere as a trace gas.The current concentration is about 0.04% (417 ppm) by volume, having risen from ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide.

Material properties of diamond - Wikipedia.

Thermal conductivity Unlike most electrical insulators, diamond is a good conductor of heat because of the strong covalent bonding and low phonon scattering. Thermal conductivity of natural diamond was measured to be about 2200 W/(m.K), which is five times more than silver , the most thermally conductive metal..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_properties_of_diamond.

Convection - Wikipedia.

Convection is single or multiphase fluid flow that occurs spontaneously due to the combined effects of material property heterogeneity and body forces on a fluid, most commonly density and gravity (see buoyancy).When the cause of the convection is unspecified, convection due to the effects of thermal expansion and buoyancy can be assumed. Convection may also take place ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convection.