Thermal Resistance Wikipedia

Thermal management (electronics) - Wikipedia.

A thermal interface material or mastic (aka TIM) is used to fill the gaps between thermal transfer surfaces, such as between microprocessors and heatsinks, in order to increase thermal transfer efficiency.It has a higher thermal conductivity value in Z-direction than xy-direction. Applications Personal computers. Due to recent technological developments and public interest, the retail ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_management_(electronics).

Thermal bridge - Wikipedia.

A thermal bridge, also called a cold bridge, heat bridge, or thermal bypass, is an area or component of an object which has higher thermal conductivity than the surrounding materials, creating a path of least resistance for heat transfer. Thermal bridges result in an overall reduction in thermal resistance of the object. The term is frequently discussed in the context ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_bridge.

Thermal paste - Wikipedia.

Thermal paste (also called thermal compound, thermal grease, thermal interface material (TIM), thermal gel, heat paste, heat sink compound, heat sink paste or CPU grease) is a thermally conductive (but usually electrically insulating) chemical compound, which is commonly used as an interface between heat sinks and heat sources such as high-power semiconductor ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_paste.

Thermal shock - Wikipedia.

Thermal shock is a type of rapidly transient mechanical load.By definition, it is a mechanical load caused by a rapid change of temperature of a certain point. It can be also extended to the case of a thermal gradient, which makes different parts of an object expand by different amounts. This differential expansion can be more directly understood in terms of strain, than in terms of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_shock.

Thermal conductivity detector - Wikipedia.

The thermal conductivity detector (TCD), also known as a katharometer, is a bulk property detector and a chemical specific detector commonly used in gas chromatography. This detector senses changes in the thermal conductivity of the column eluent and compares it to a reference flow of carrier gas. Since most compounds have a thermal conductivity much less than that of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity_detector.

Thermal - Wikipedia.

A thermal column (or thermal) is a rising mass of buoyant air, a convective current in the atmosphere, that transfers heat energy vertically. Thermals are created by the uneven heating of Earth's surface from solar radiation , and are an example of convection , ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal.

Thermal resistance - Wikipedia.

Thermal resistance is a heat property and a measurement of a temperature difference by which an object or material resists a heat flow.Thermal resistance is the reciprocal of thermal conductance. (Absolute) thermal resistance R in kelvins per watt (K/W) is a property of a particular component. For example, a characteristic of a heat sink.; Specific thermal ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_resistance.

Thermal diode - Wikipedia.

One-way heat-flow. A thermal diode in this sense is a device whose thermal resistance is different for heat flow in one direction than for heat flow in the other direction. I.e., when the thermal diode's first terminal is hotter than the second, heat will flow easily from the first to the second, but when the second terminal is hotter than the first, little heat will flow from the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_diode.

Electrical resistance and conductance - Wikipedia.

The electrical resistance of an object is a measure of its opposition to the flow of electric current.Its reciprocal quantity is electrical conductance, measuring the ease with which an electric current passes.Electrical resistance shares some conceptual parallels with mechanical friction.The SI unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (), while electrical conductance is ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_resistance_and_conductance.

Resettable fuse - Wikipedia.

A resettable fuse or polymeric positive temperature coefficient device (PPTC) is a passive electronic component used to protect against overcurrent faults in electronic circuits.The device is also known as a multifuse or polyfuse or polyswitch.They are similar in function to PTC thermistors in certain situations but operate on mechanical changes instead of charge carrier ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettable_fuse.

Tog (unit) - Wikipedia.

The tog is a measure of thermal insulance of a unit area, also known as thermal resistance.It is commonly used in the textile industry and often seen quoted on, for example, duvets and carpet underlay.. The Shirley Institute in Manchester, England developed the tog as an easy-to-follow alternative to the SI unit of m 2 K/W. The name comes from the informal word togs for ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tog_(unit).

Temperature coefficient - Wikipedia.

A temperature coefficient describes the relative change of a physical property that is associated with a given change in temperature.For a property R that changes when the temperature changes by dT, the temperature coefficient ? is defined by the following equation: = Here ? has the dimension of an inverse temperature and can be expressed e.g. in 1/K or K -1..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperature_coefficient.

Silver - Wikipedia.

Silver is a chemical element with the symbol Ag (from the Latin argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European h2erg: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver.

Wind - Wikipedia.

Historically, the Beaufort wind force scale (created by Beaufort) provides an empirical description of wind speed based on observed sea conditions.Originally it was a 13-level scale (0-12), but during the 1940s, the scale was expanded to 18 levels (0-17). There are general terms that differentiate winds of different average speeds such as a breeze, a gale, a storm, or a hurricane..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind.

Kevlar - Wikipedia.

Kevlar (para-aramid) is a heat-resistant and strong synthetic fiber, related to other aramids such as Nomex and Technora.Developed by Stephanie Kwolek at DuPont in 1965, the high-strength material was first used commercially in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. It is typically spun into ropes or fabric sheets that can be used as such, or as an ingredient in ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevlar.

Flame retardant - Wikipedia.

Flame retardant cotton is cotton that has been treated to prevent or slow ignition by different treatments applied during the manufacturing process. Cotton is typically made flame-resistant by chemical applications of polymeric, nonpolymeric, and polymeric/nonpolymeric hybrids that are composed of one or more of the elements such as nitrogen, sodium, phosphorus, silicon, ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flame_retardant.

Early thermal weapons - Wikipedia.

Early thermal weapons, which used heat or burning action to destroy or damage enemy personnel, fortifications or territories, were employed in warfare during the classical and medieval periods (approximately the 8th century BC until the mid-16th century AD).. Incendiary devices were frequently used as projectiles during warfare, particularly during sieges and naval battles: ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_thermal_weapons.

Random-access memory - Wikipedia.

The memory cell is the fundamental building block of computer memory.The memory cell is an electronic circuit that stores one bit of binary information and it must be set to store a logic 1 (high voltage level) and reset to store a logic 0 (low voltage level). Its value is maintained/stored until it is changed by the set/reset process..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Random-access_memory.